Theory Application

Leadership Theory: Servant Leadership

What is Servant Leadership: “When leaders place the good of followers over their own self interests and emphasize follower development” (Hale & Fields, 2007)Servant Leadership is classified by 10 characteristics, 3 antecedent conditions, and 7 behaviors.

Characteristics

  1. Listening– Communicate by listening first, validate followers perspectives
  2. Empathy– putting yourself in their shoes; understand what followers are thinking and feeling, confirms and validates the follower making them feel unique
  3. Healing– cares about the personal well being of followers, support followers by helping them overcome personal problems (two way street)
  4. Awareness- attuned and receptive to the their physical social and political environments; understanding oneself and the impact one has on others, awareness for the whole picture
  5. Persuasion- clear and persistent communication that convinces others to change, creates change through the use of gentle non judgemental argument
  6. Conceptualization- an individual’s ability to be a visionary for an organization, equips servant leaders to respond to complex organizational problems in creative ways
  7. Foresight- a servants ability to know the future, ability to predict what is going to come based on what has happened and is happening in the present
  8. Stewardship- taking responsibility in the leadership roles in trusted to the leader, hold the organization in trust for the greater good of society
  9. Commitment to the growth of people- treating each follower as a unique person with intrinsic value; committed to helping each person in the organization to grow personally and professionally (examples: providing followers with opportunity for career development, helping them develop new work skills, taking a personal interest in their ideas, involving them in decision making
  10. Building community- allows followers to identify with something greater than themselves that they value; build community to provide a place where people can feel safe and connected with others but are still allowed to express their own individuality

Antecedent Conditions

  1. Context and culture – the nature of the setting affects the way in which servant leadership is carried out.
  2. Leader attributes – different traits interact with their ability to engage in servant leadership
  3. Follower receptivity – concerns the question, “Do all employees show a desire for servant leadership?” Research suggests no.

Behaviors

  1. Conceptualizing- Refers to the servant leader’s thorough understanding of the organization — it’s purposes, complexities and mission..
  2. Emotional healing- Involves being sensitive to the personal concerns and wellbeing of others; makes themselves available to others, standing by them and providing them with support.
  3. Putting followers first- Using actions and words that clearly demonstrate to followers that they are a priority
  4. Helping followers grow and succeed- Knowing followers’ professional and personal goals and helping them to accomplish those aspirations
  5. Behaving ethically- Doing the right thing in the right way
  6. Empowering- Refers to allowing followers the freedom to be independent, make decisions on their own, and be self sufficient.
  7. Creating value for the community- By continuously and intentionally giving back to the community.

LAS Protocol: LDR 200 Service Trip to Detroit


As part of our LAS protocol we have to take Leadership 200. When students are asked what their favorite part of LDR 200 is they will more than likely say the service trip to Detroit. Prior to the service trip I learned about what Servant Leadership is. As soon as I learned that servant leadership was more than just volunteering, and that it was more of a sate of mine, I knew I wanted to strive to be a servant leader.

The service trip to Detroit was a perfect example of Servant Leadership. Throughout this trip, the people we were serving were always put first. The service trip to Detroit was a great experience. A specific example of servant leadership during the trip was my experience at Blight Busters. Before going out and actually volunteering, the owners/founders of the company gave us a presentation about how they came up with the idea of starting Blight Busters. The owner had said he originally came up with the idea after cleaning up the yard of an abandoned house next to his. His other neighbors showed great appreciation that he was cleaning up with neighborhood. They felt that by him cleaning up the rubble in the neighborhood, the neighbor hood would become safer for their children. This eventually expanded and he as well as others began to clean up other areas of Detroit.  A small action turned into a business that has been a part of helping Detroit back on its feet. The owner said that the goal of the business is just that, to help the City of Detroit and by cleaning up and getting rid of the run down appearance that many people tie to Detroit is the first step to changing the overall opinions of Detroit. When serving with Blight Busters, many of the LASers noticed that there was a little girl volunteering with us. Turns out this little girl volunteers with the Blight Busters every Saturday morning. Blight Busters don’t know where she lies or who her parent are they just know that they can count of this little girl to volunteer every Saturday. This little girl is a perfect example of a servant leader. She was not volunteering because of the recognition or reward she would receive. She volunteered because she knew that it would help the city o Detroit.

Every day I strive to apply this theory to my life. To accomplish this theory, one must dedicate their life to it. Being a servant leader is ore than volunteering, it’s a state of mind.

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